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veggies and fruit your dog can eat


(THESE ARE ALL THE FOODS THAT ARE SAFE FOR DOGS)

Consider steaming or boiling cruciferous veggies such as broccoli, cauliflower, and cabbage, as they are much easier to digest when they are cooked.

• Asparagus-When cut into bite size pieces, asparagus for dogs makes a healthy veggie option because of vitamin K, A, B1, B2, C and E, along with the folate, iron, copper, fiber, manganese and potassium that’s found in them

• Bell peppers (red, green, yellow)- Bell peppers, particularly red ones, provide beta carotene and fiber, as well as other nutrients and antioxidants.

• Broccoli- is a good source of vitamins C and K as well as vitamin A, folate, manganese, and fiber.

• Cabbage-Purple, savoy... all types of antioxidant-rich cabbage is safe for dogs to eat and even beneficial. It aids in digestion, is good for the skin, and is cancer-fighting. But it can also cause gas, so introduce slowly and only feed a little bit, such as a sprinkling of chopped up cabbage on top of your dog’s dinner. Furthermore, though raw cabbage is perfectly fine in smaller quantities, it does contain a natural compound called thiocyanate which suppresses the thyroid gland and over time can create hypothyroidism if regularly feeding large amounts. If you lightly cook the cabbage then you deactivate the thiocyanate, so cooking the cabbage is advisable if feeding regularly in larger quantities. You have to eat a lot of raw cabbage over multiple days to create the hypothyroidism but it can be done, so cooking and/or moderation is key

• carrots-Carrots are a good source of beta-carotene as well as a number of other vitamins and nutrients. They are also low in calories, which is why they are often used in dog food or as healthy treats.

• Cauliflower-can eat cauliflower in moderation. Cauliflower is rich in phytonutrients and antioxidants, it’s good for dogs.Cauliflower is a cruciferous vegetable. Cauliflower is a good source of vitamins and soluble fibre which can help with digestion and clean dog’s teeth. Vitamins have antioxidant abilities can reduce the risk of many diseases, including inflammation and aging.Research shows that cauliflower contains powerful carcinogen blockers named isothiocyanate which can prevent cancer cells from spreading. But at the same time you need to note that isothiocyanate may irritate the bowels and cause a lot of gas, so dogs can’t eat too much cauliflower and keep the amount of cauliflower less than 5% in dog’s regular food.

• Celery-is safe for your dog. It provides a good low calorie filler with meals and a great treat,good source of fibre and potassium and secondly the food is a diurectic that richly stimulates the production of urine and can aid in eliminating of excess fluid,this is important as it helps the kidney and urinary tract from infections become non-extistant.It also as a juice form can aid the ease of discomfort af arthritic infections.

• Cucumber-can help satisfy hunger while providing the right nutrients in small amounts as they contain carbohydrates and little or no fats and oils.

• Green beans- are a good source of plant fibre, vitamin K, vitamin C, and manganese. If your dog has a tendency to put on weight, then replacing some of her regular food with green beans is a great low calorie way to fill her up and help her maintain a healthy weight. Many dogs enjoy green beans frozen.

• Lettuce-only small amounts of lettuce.Lettuce is a herbaceous plants and has many varieties. It’s a common vegetable in many areas. Lettuce is low in nutrition value, just contains some vitamins and fibres, has some health benefits. It’s low in calorie, can balance dog’s diet.If your dog hass suffered from constipation, you could feed with lettuce in small quantities, it can ease constipation. However,if dogs eat too much lettuce as it will cause diarrhea and other digestive problems.

• Peas-Peas contain a number of nutrients, including vitamin K, C, B1, A, B6, B3, and B2, as well as manganese, fiber, folate, phosphorus, protein, magnesium, copper, iron, zinc, and potassium. They are also a relatively low-calorie food with high dietary fiber, which is great for dogs that need to manage their weight.

• Pumpkin- fiber, vitamin A and anti-oxidants. It can help alleviate diarrhea and constipation. And it has been known to promote his overall cardiovascular health.

• Green Beans-Green beans are another safe vegetable that can be found in dog food. They are a good source of manganese, fiber, and vitamins C, K, and A. Additionally, green beans are low in calories and are, like carrots, a good choice for those pets that tend to be overweight or obese.

• Spinach-We certainly understand the value of spinach in our own diets, but luckily this green, leafy vegetable can be just as powerful for your dog. Although it’s high in iron (with almost twice as much of it as most other sources), spinach is a particularly good option for your dog since it helps fend off inflammatory and cardiovascular issues, along with cancer.

• Sweet potato-These sweet spuds are often added to pet foods and treats because they are a good source of carbohydrates as well as fiber, vitamin B6, vitamin C, beta carotene, and manganese. Sweet potatoes can also provide extra energy so that the proteins in the diet can be spared for use as energy and can complete the many important tasks that proteins must accomplish to keep your pet healthy.

• sprouts-Maybe if your kid sees your dog eating her brussels sprouts, she’ll hop on board and eat them, too. And your dog should be eating brussels sprouts for their vitamins K and G, manganese, folate, fiber, potassium and vitamins A, B1 and B6.

• Potatoes-Like sweet potatoes, potatoes are a carbohydrate-rich food that is great for providing extra energy. However, it's important that potatoes—like any other food or ingredient—be included as a balanced part of the diet. Adding additional calories to your dog's diet can quickly lead to issues with weight.

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Steer clear of: Never feed your pet onions or garlic as they are toxic in all forms: cooked, raw, and even onion powder. These cause damage to the red blood cells, ultimately causing them to burst. Rhubarb and wild mushrooms also contain toxins. We suggest avoiding corn as it is a common allergen among pets.

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fruits safe for dogs

Be sure to wash all fruits and remove rinds, inedible skins, seeds, and pits before feeding to pets.

• Apple-Besides the fact that it’s super fun to watch a dog eat an apple, the powerful antioxidants and loads of vitamin C will do wonders for your dog’s diet, as well.apples are wonderful crunchy treats for your dog. Apples with the skin on are full of plant chemicals (phytonutrients) that are thought to be protective against some types of cancer in humans. They are a source of vitamins A and C and fibre. Apple seeds, however, contain cyanide so your dog should not be allowed to eat the core. Though the effects of a few apple seeds will likely not harm your dog, the deleterious effects can accumulate over time if allowed to eat apple seeds regularly

• Apricot-cancer fighting properties as well as fibres (Apricot Seed.) It looks identical to the Almond and is rich in Vitamin B-17 or Laetril. B-17(do not feed the pip)

• Banana-high in potassium (great for muscle and blood vessel function as well as for regulating the acidity of body fluids), fiber (a handy home remedy for the occasional bout of doggy diarrhea or constipation) and magnesium (important for energy transport and protein building in the body). Bananas have lots of pyridoxine (Vitamin B6), which helps metabolize proteins and regulates blood cell function so the blood can bring more oxygen to the brain and muscle. They also contain Vitamin C, an antioxidant that protects cells from damage and helps build cartilage. Pup Prep: Mash a banana and mix it in with your dog’s food. Be forewarned that the compounds in bananas that make them smell banana-y are offensive to some canines.

• Blueberries- have high levels of resveratrol with anti-cancer and heart disease fighting qualities. They make a great option for your dog’s diet. As an added bonus, the tannins found in blueberries also help prevent urinary tract infections.

• Cantaloupe- Cantaloupe for dogs will help with your canine’s eyesight. Plus cantaloupes are loaded vitamin A and lots of beta carotene, which helps reduce the risk of cancer and prevents cell damage. It’s also a good source of vitamins B-6 and C, fiber, folate, niacin and potassium.

• Mango-Research has shown antioxidant compounds in mango fruit have been found to protect against cancers. These compounds include quercetin, isoquercitrin, astragalin, fisetin, gallic acid and methylgallat, as well as the abundant enzymes.2. The high levels of fiber, pectin and vitamin C help to lower serum cholesterol levels, specifically Low-Density Lipoprotein (the bad stuff). Mangoes can be used both internally and externally for the skin. Mangos clear clogged pores and eliminate pimples. Mangoes are rich in vitamin A, which promotes good eyesight and prevents night blindness and dry eyes. The tartaric acid, malic acid, and a trace of citric acid found in the fruit help to maintain the alkali reserve of the body.Dogs can and should eat mango slices because they contain enzymes for breaking down protein. The fiber in mangos also helps digestion and elimination.Finally, the generous amounts of vitamin C and vitamin A in mangos, plus 25 different kinds of carotenoids keep your immune system healthy and strong.(do not feed seeds or pit though)

• Orange- Everything about oranges that makes them nutritional powerhouses for us humans benefits dogs, too. But use caution, because oranges have properties that can irritate and upset your dog’s stomach. First of all, use moderation when feeding oranges to your dog. The fruit is high in citric acid, too much of which can assault a sensitive digestive system. In addition, orange rind itself is rich with citrus oils that are definite bad news for dogs, so be sure to throw away the peel and only feed your dog a few small orange slices at a time

• Pear (only a cube or 2)Pears are naturally high in vitamins C and K, as well as nutrients such as copper—all of which act as antioxidants to protect your and your dog’s cells from damage from free radicals. One pear contains up to 11 percent of our daily-recommended intake of vitamin C and 9.5 percent of our daily-recommended intake of copper. Pears are also said to have more nutrients per calorie than calorie per nutrient.Because they are high in fiber and have a low glycemic index, pears make a smart snack for those with diabetes. The bloodstream slowly absorbs a pear’s carbs (just about 26 grams per pear), preventing a spike in blood sugar and helping to control blood glucose levels. Lightly sweet, pears can also satisfy the sweet tooth in a healthier way than other sweets.

• Pineapple-Pineapple can be a special treat for your dog. Pineapple contains mostly sugar but it also contains calcium and potassium. Frozen pineapple can be a fun summer treat for your dog.

• Raspberries-raspberries are great antioxidants, protecting you against damaging free radicals. having a few berries in there diets has benefits. Raspberries in particular are a good source of dietary fiber, potassium, magnesium, manganese, copper and iron. They're also abundant in vitamins C, K and B-complex.

• Strawberries-strawberries are a nutritional powerhouse for both you and your dog. Like their blue cousins, strawberries are full of antioxidants. They also boast high fiber and a lot of vitamin C. Here’s a bonus: Strawberries even contain an enzyme that can help whiten your dog’s teeth. Keep a bag of frozen strawberries in your freezer to make smoothies for yourself, and you’ll also have a crunchy snack on hand for man’s best friend. Just don’t feed unlimited amounts, because even though the sugar in strawberries is natural sugar, too much can be bad

• blackberries-are healthy berries for your dog, along with strawberries and blueberries. Like those others, blackberries are loaded with antioxidants to fight free radicals in your dog, and also have plenty of fiber and vitamins, too

• Watermelon-If it’s lycopene that you’re looking to add to your dog’s diet, watermelon is your best source. The health benefits don’t stop there, though. Give your pooch a piece of this delicious summer treat and you’ll be loading him with up with tons of healthy vitamin A, B-6 and C, as well as thiamin.

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Steer clear of: Grapes and raisins can cause kidney damage for cats and dogs, so avoid feeding these entirely. Citrus fruits like lemons, limes, and grapefruit as well as persimmons can cause an upset stomach.

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OTHER FOODS GOOD FOR YOUR DOG

• Eggs-Eggs are a great source of very digestible protein, riboflavin, and selenium. For some dogs that are prone to digestive upset, eggs can give them a little protein boost. Adding eggs to your dog’s food is a healthy treat. Make sure to use cooked whole egg, as raw egg whites can cause biotin deficiency. If you do a lot of training with your dog, consider taking cooked eggs to your next class as training treats.

• Brewer’s yeast is the yeast that’s left over from making alcohol. Dogs seem to really enjoy the tangy taste of brewer’s yeast. It’s full of B vitamins which are good for skin, coat, and carbohydrate metabolism. Make sure you’re using brewer’s yeast (available at health food stores), not baking yeast which will make your dog sick. Brewer’s yeast can spice up your dog’s appetite. Just sprinkle a little on the food of a picky eater and watch her dive into her food.

• Salmon is a fatty fish which is also a good source of omega- 3 fatty acids. These fats support the immune system and can be beneficial for skin and coat health. There has also been some indication that they may benefit dogs with allergies. You can feed salmon or salmon oil. If feeding salmon, make sure it’s cooked before serving, as raw salmon can carry a parasite that can make your dog sick

• Flax seed (ground or oil) is a good source of omega-3 fatty acids, which are essential fatty acids that are good for skin and coat. Whole flax seeds are best if ground right before feeding as this type of fat can go rancid quickly. Flax seed can also be added to your dog’s diet as a source of fibre. Flax oil is a more concentrated form of omega- 3 fatty acids without the fibre. Make sure that you store the oil or seeds in the fridge in an air tight dark container.

• Yogurt is a good source of available calcium and protein. When choosing yogurt, pick one that has live active bacteria and no sugars or artificial sweeteners. The active bacteria may act as probiotics. If your pooch is pudgy, make sure that you pick fat-free yogurt but not one that contains fat substitutes (e.g., Simplesse or Olestra). Frozen yogurt is a nice summer treat for dogs.

• Oatmeal is a good source of soluble fibre. This can be beneficial for some older dogs that may have trouble maintaining bowel regularity. Oatmeal is also an alternative source of grain for dogs that are allergic to wheat. It can be fed in conjunction with probiotics to enhance their function. Keep in mind oatmeal should always be fed cooked and plain with no sugar or flavouring. As always, check with your veterinarian before making any major changes to your dog’s diet, especially if they are on any medications. Upsetting the vitamin and mineral balances in your dog’s diet can have negative effects on your dog’s health and some medications interact badly with some nutrients. The aim of most dog owners is to give their dogs the best diet possible. Good nutrition coupled with a health care program may result in extending your dog’s life by as much as 15 percent. The suggestions above are not meant to replace your dog’s normal, balanced diet. Rather, they are ideas for alternative treats or for adding a little variety to your dog’s meals.

• Rice is good to feed when your dog has an upset tummy and needs a bland meal. There are a variety of different types of rice. Brown rice is a little higher in protein and a little lower in fat when compared to white rice. White or instant rice is an easily digestible carbohydrate which makes it a good source of energy when your dog has an upset tummy or if you are feeding an older dog.

• Popcorn that has been air popped with no butter or salt is a great lowcalorie treat for your dog. Popcorn contains potassium as well as the bone-building minerals phosphorous, magnesium, and calcium. So snuggle up and share that popcorn with your furry friend next time you watch a movie.

• lean meat (chicken, beef, or pork) with no visible fat and no added sauces or seasonings can be a great training treat or can add a bit of good-quality extra protein to your dog’s diet. Lean meat is an excellent, balanced source of amino acids, the building blocks of muscle in your dog’s body. Meat is also a great source of B vitamins (Thiamin, Riboflavin, Niacin, Pantothenic acid, Pyridoxine, and Cobalamine). These vitamins are involved in energy metabolism in the body.

• Liver is available freeze-dried in most pet stores and it is a great training treat. You can also buy it fresh in the grocery store to feed at home. Fresh liver can be cooked and then baked to make your own liver treats. Liver is an excellent source of B vitamins (Thiamin, Riboflavin, Niacin, Pantothenic acid, and Folic acid), Vitamin A, and Vitamin K. It is also a great source of iron. Warning: Too much liver may be toxic to dogs because of its high vitamin A content. Therefore, it is best to limit the amount of liver fed to your dog to not more than 1 g of fresh liver/Kg body weight per day.

• Cottage cheese is high in protein and calcium and it’s fairly bland, so it can be a good way to add some extra protein to your dog’s diet. Cottage cheese is a dairy product and some dogs don’t do well with dairy, so make sure you start with just a small amount.

• Parsley has long been thought to improve doggie breath, so next time you are baking treats for your dog, try adding a few tablespoons of chopped parsley for added flavour and colour. Parsley can also be a good source of calcium, potassium, and beta-carotene.

• Peanut butter is a healthy, high-protein treat for dogs. Try smearing some inside or on one of your dog’s toys, or let him lick out the container when it’s almost finished.

• Rutabaga A sorely ignored veggie, similar to a turnip. Rutabagas are very good boiled and mashed. They’re available year-round in most grocery stores and keep well. Their high levels of Vitamin C, potassium and carotenoids (precursors to Vitamin A) aid eye health and maintenance of DNA activation in cells. They are also important in immune system function and have a number of lesser-known phytochemicals, which are shown to reduce the risk of several chronic diseases associated with aging. Pup Prep: Peel, boil and mash the rutabaga, then add a little bit of safflower or olive oil; these oils are not harmful to dogs, who need fats and handle them far better than do humans.

• Nori-Dried edible seaweed (red algae species), a Japanese staple. Often associated with sushi, nori is available in some supermarkets, and certainly in those with Asian food items. It has protein, galactans (a soluble fiber), Vitamins C, E and all the Bs, and minerals such as zinc and copper. It also contains some lesser-known sterols and chlorophyll, which have been investigated for their effects on regulating metabolism. Nori may have beneficial effects on fat metabolism, immune function and anti-tumor response. Pup Prep: Nori does not have a strong odor or flavor, and the paper-thin sheets can be torn and soaked in broth, then added to food, or just added dry

• . Rosemary-Aromatic mint relative. Rosemary provides some fiber, iron and calcium in addition to several phytochemicals thought to improve immune function and act as anti-inflammatory agents and antioxidants. Pup Prep: Wash a sprig of fresh rosemary and add the minced needles (leaves) to foods.

• Swiss Chard-A pretty veggie known as a “green.” Chard belongs to the same family as beets and spinach and has tons of nutrients, which are best maintained by blanching and not boiling the leaves and stalks to mush. (Some feel that, in order to lap up any leeched nutrients, the water in which chard is blanched should be consumed too.) Blanching sweetens the leaves and frees up some of the oxalates, which can bind minerals. Chard’s nutrients have the potential to maintain bone health, blood vessel integrity, eye health and immune function and benefit optimal muscle function and energy production. Pup Prep: Offer your dog some blanched, chopped chard enhanced with a bit of olive oil; if you’re lucky, your best friend will want the blanching water too!

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